Harnessing research evaluation frameworks to build an institutional research trajectory: the yin and the yang

McMillen, Caroline (2011). Harnessing research evaluation frameworks to build an institutional research trajectory: the yin and the yang. In: Perspectives on Metrics-Based Research Evaluation - Two Years On, The University of Queensland, (). 16-17 May 2011.

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Author McMillen, Caroline
Title of paper Harnessing research evaluation frameworks to build an institutional research trajectory: the yin and the yang
Conference name Perspectives on Metrics-Based Research Evaluation - Two Years On
Conference location The University of Queensland
Conference dates 16-17 May 2011
Convener Thomson Reuters & The University of Queensland
Publication Year 2011
Sub-type Oral presentation
Abstract/Summary The developmental trajectory of building institutional research performance mirrors the trajectory of individual research careers. An increase in the volume of research activity precedes a more mature phase when work of high quality and impact is generated which attracts attention from international peers resulting in the opportunity to develop international collaborations, highly cited outputs and associated awards and public recognition. Research evaluation frameworks such as Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) focus appropriately on measuring the ‘destination’ of a research trajectory- world class performance in disciplinary fields. As would be expected, in the most recent ERA exercise, there is a clear relationship between the age of Australian institutions and the number of disciplinary areas in those institutions assessed as being of world standard or above. In this context, it is important for institutions to determine whether they are ‘hitting above their weight’ and are on an upward trajectory in terms of research performance relative to their institutional age. Thus ERA outcomes, in combination with a dashboard of other research performance measures can inform institutions of the effectiveness of their research strategy. The major limitation of ERA, however, is the long shadow cast by the 6 year reference period – the length of the reference period necessarily limits the usefulness of the outcomes for those younger institutions which are rapidly growing their research capacity, activity and quality ‘in real time’. This is of particular relevance in Australia where the median age of universities is around 24 years and where the future of Australia’s research capacity will reside in the growth of high quality research in those institutions which are currently ‘market challengers'.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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