From spotlight to echo chamber? Citizen journalism and international news

Bromley, Michael (2012). From spotlight to echo chamber? Citizen journalism and international news. In Judith Clarke and Michael Bromley (Ed.), International news in the digital age: East-West perceptions of a new world order (pp. 23-40) New York , NY, United States: Routledge.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Bromley, Michael
Title of chapter From spotlight to echo chamber? Citizen journalism and international news
Title of book International news in the digital age: East-West perceptions of a new world order
Place of Publication New York , NY, United States
Publisher Routledge
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Series Routledge Research in Journalism
ISBN 9780415887229
0415887224
Editor Judith Clarke
Michael Bromley
Volume number 4
Chapter number 2
Start page 23
End page 40
Total pages 18
Total chapters 12
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
What constitutes the modern mass media genre of "international news" has changed. Shifts within rhe global mass media landscape have led to more self-representation in the global South as the indigenous press has begun to challenge the previously dominant western content makers and carriers. Yer this has had limited effect. The local press has tended to mimic western models, shaping international news as a function of narrow national interest, audience satisfaction, geopolitical affinity and media ownership, and rendering it less comprehensive than proponents of the New World Information and Communication Order (NWICO) of the 1970s and 1980s imagined would be the case (Mody 2010; Mowlana 1993,59). At the same time, even before accounts of events can be relayed to users by global news wholesalers and retailers (the Associated Press, Reuters, the BBC, CNN, Zee, Al-jazeera) and the national press made global by their use of the internet (New York Times, Guardian, Times of India),! citizens post their own reports almosr instantaneously in the same general digital space.2 This was rhe pattern of the user generation of media content established at the time of the Indian Ocean tsunami and the 7/7 terrorist attacks in London. Witnesses to, and participants in, events captured sound and vision on domestic recording devices and either uploaded them to third-party websites (where they were often accessed by mainstream media and re-used) or posted them directly to the media themselves. In these ways, citizens acted like journalists in spotlighting events. [Extract from chapter introduction]
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 03 Jun 2011, 11:02:02 EST by Professor Michael Bromley on behalf of School of Journalism and Communication