Depressive disorders and bone mineral density in a community based sample of premenopausal women

Williams, L. J., Pasco, J. A., Dodd, S., Nicholson, G. N. and Berk, M. (2008). Depressive disorders and bone mineral density in a community based sample of premenopausal women. In: ISAD 4th Biennial Conference, Cape Town, South Africa, (S96-S97). 14-17 March 2008. doi:10.1016/j.jad.2007.12.091


Author Williams, L. J.
Pasco, J. A.
Dodd, S.
Nicholson, G. N.
Berk, M.
Title of paper Depressive disorders and bone mineral density in a community based sample of premenopausal women
Conference name ISAD 4th Biennial Conference
Conference location Cape Town, South Africa
Conference dates 14-17 March 2008
Journal name Journal of Affective Disorders   Check publisher's open access policy
Publication Year 2008
Sub-type Published abstract
DOI 10.1016/j.jad.2007.12.091
ISSN 0165-0327
1573-2517
Volume 107
Issue S1
Start page S96
End page S97
Total pages 2
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Introduction There is data to suggest that the prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) is disproportionately higher among those with depression, although findings are equivocal. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between depression and BMD in 448 premenopausal women (20–58 yr) drawn from a randomly-selected community based sample of women participating in the Geelong Osteoporosis Study. Methods Lifetime history of depressive and anxiety disorders were diagnosed utilising a clinical interview (SCID-I/NP). BMD was measured at the PA-spine, hip, total body and forearm using dual energy absorptiometry (Lunar DPX-L) and anthropometric measurements were recorded. Medication use, menopause status, activity levels, dietary intake and smoking status were self-reported. Results There were no differences in age, weight, height, BMI, alcohol consumption, calcium intake, smoking or unadjusted BMD between the groups, although women with a lifetime history of depression were less physically active than those with no previous history (81.9% vs 90.8%, p = 0.009). Weight, height and anxiety-adjusted BMD was 2.4% lower at the PA-spine (1.263 (95% CI 1.238–1.289) vs 1.294 (1.270–1.318) g/cm2, p = 0.04) and age, weight and anxiety-adjusted BMD was 2.8% lower at the total hip (1.034 (1.014–1.055) vs 1.064 (1.044–1.083) g/cm2, p = 0.02) in those with a lifetime history of depression compared to those non-depressed. There was a trend towards BMD being lower at the total body (p = 0.12) but no relationship was detected at the forearm sites. These patterns persisted after further adjustment for smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, calcium intake and medications known to affect BMD. Conclusions BMD was reduced among those with a lifetime history of depression independent of age, weight, height, anxiety, smoking, physical activity, alcohol consumption, calcium intake and medications known to affect BMD. These data are consistent with previous findings and suggest that depression is a risk factor for reduced BMD among younger women.
Keyword Depressive disorders
Women
Psychiatric epidemiology
Medical outcomes
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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