Oncolytic therapy using a mutant type-1 herpes simplex virus and the role of the immune system

Lambright, E. S., Abbas, A. E., Toyoizumi, T., Coukos, G. and Kaiser, L. R. (1999). Oncolytic therapy using a mutant type-1 herpes simplex virus and the role of the immune system. In: 35th Annual Meeting of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, San Antonio TX, United States, (1756-1761). 24-29 January 1999. doi:10.1016/S0003-4975(99)00852-8


Author Lambright, E. S.
Abbas, A. E.
Toyoizumi, T.
Coukos, G.
Kaiser, L. R.
Title of paper Oncolytic therapy using a mutant type-1 herpes simplex virus and the role of the immune system
Conference name 35th Annual Meeting of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons
Conference location San Antonio TX, United States
Conference dates 24-29 January 1999
Journal name Annals of Thoracic Surgery   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 1999
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1016/S0003-4975(99)00852-8
ISSN 0003-4975
1552-6259
Volume 68
Issue 5
Start page 1756
End page 1761
Total pages 6
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background. Herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1716, a replication- restricted herpes simplex virus type 1, has shown efficacy as an oncolytic treatment for central nervous system tumors, breast cancer, ovarian cancer, and malignant mesothelioma. We evaluated the efficacy of HSV-1716 in a murine lung cancer model, Lewis lung carcinoma.

Methods. Lewis lung carcinoma cells were infected with HSV-1716 and implanted in the flanks of mice at varying ratios of infected to uninfected cells. Tumor burden was assessed by measurement of the weight of the tumor nodule. The role of the immune system was examined by performing experiments in both immunocompetent and SCID mice. Tumors were implanted in the opposite flank to evaluate the vaccine effect.

Results. In immunocompetent and SCID animals, ratio of 1:10 (infected-to- uninfected) cells completely prevented tumor formation and ratio of 1.100 suppressed tumor growth. Established tumors at a distant site in the groups receiving HSV-1716 infected cells showed no difference in size versus control, suggesting absence of a vaccine effect.

Conclusions. We conclude that HSV-1716 may provide a oncolytic therapy for lung cancer even in the absence of immune system induction and a 'carrier' cell could potentially deliver this vector.
Keyword THYMIDINE KINASE GENE
I CLINICAL-TRIAL
RECOMBINANT ADENOVIRUSES
MALIGNANT MESOTHELIOMA
REPLICATION
CANCER
CELLS
NEUROVIRULENCE
VACCINATION
RESPONSES
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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