The effects of causal uncertainty, causal importance, and initial attitude on attention to causal persuasive arguments

Tobin, Stephanie J. and Weary, Gifford (2008) The effects of causal uncertainty, causal importance, and initial attitude on attention to causal persuasive arguments. Social Cognition, 26 1: 44-65. doi:10.1521/soco.2008.26.1.44

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Author Tobin, Stephanie J.
Weary, Gifford
Title The effects of causal uncertainty, causal importance, and initial attitude on attention to causal persuasive arguments
Journal name Social Cognition   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-016X
Publication date 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1521/soco.2008.26.1.44
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 26
Issue 1
Start page 44
End page 65
Total pages 22
Place of publication United States
Publisher Guilford Publications, Inc.
Language eng
Abstract In two studies, we examined how individual differences in causal uncertainty (CU), causal importance (CI), and initial attitudes affected the processing of a persuasive message that contained causal or non-causal arguments. We predicted that high CU individuals' doubts about their causal understanding of events would be activated when they were presented with counterattitudinal arguments. When these individuals also placed a high value on causal understanding (high CI), they should scrutinize any available causal explanations. As a result, they should be more persuaded by strong compared to weak causal arguments. In support of these predictions, we found in two studies that high CU/high CI participants were more persuaded by strong compared to weak counterattitudinal causal arguments. Mediational analyses in Study 2 revealed that high CU/high CI participants were more persuaded by strong causal arguments because they were more confident in them. Implications for the CU model and persuasion processes are discussed.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 16 May 2011, 17:00:30 EST by Dr Stephanie Tobin on behalf of School of Psychology