Do destination brands really have a personality? A comparison of two coastal tourism destinations in Australia

Murphy, L., Moscardo, G. and Benckendorff, P. (2005). Do destination brands really have a personality? A comparison of two coastal tourism destinations in Australia. In: Moisey, R.N. and McGehee, N.G., 36th Annual Conference Proceedings Travel and Tourism Research Association; The Three R's: Research, Results, Rewards. The three R's: research, results, rewards, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States, (76-85). 12-15 June 2005.

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Author Murphy, L.
Moscardo, G.
Benckendorff, P.
Title of paper Do destination brands really have a personality? A comparison of two coastal tourism destinations in Australia
Conference name The three R's: research, results, rewards
Conference location New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
Conference dates 12-15 June 2005
Proceedings title 36th Annual Conference Proceedings Travel and Tourism Research Association; The Three R's: Research, Results, Rewards
Place of Publication Boise, Idaho, United States
Publisher Travel and Tourism Research Association
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 0976806800
9780976806806
Editor Moisey, R.N.
McGehee, N.G.
Start page 76
End page 85
Total pages 10
Language eng
Abstract/Summary According to Morgan et al (2003), the need for destinations to portray a unique identity is more critical than ever yet much of destination advertising remains blue seas, cloudless skies and endless golden beaches with less than memorable tag lines. They also emphasise that, in marketing terms, brands are meant to differentiate by inciting belief, evoking emotions and prompting behaviours, and that brands have social, emotional and identity value to the users. According to Ekinci (2003), the words 'brand', 'branding' and 'destination image' have appeared in many academic references, with no apparent effort made to distinguish between destination image and destination branding. As a result he proposes a model which states that the process of destination branding begins when the evaluation of destination image includes a strong emotional attachment. Accordingly, only branded destinations are purported to be able establish an instant emotional link with their customers. He elaborates that successful destination branding involves establishing a mutual relationship between destinations and tourists by satisfying tourists' emotional and basic needs. In establishing this link between destination image and consumer self-image an important factor is Brand Personality - emphasising the human side of the brand image.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 06 May 2011, 09:26:08 EST by Dr Pierre Benckendorff on behalf of School of Tourism