Can training improve the hazard perception ability of learner and non-drivers, under a distraction condition?

Cass, Lauren (2010). Can training improve the hazard perception ability of learner and non-drivers, under a distraction condition? Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Cass, Lauren
Thesis Title Can training improve the hazard perception ability of learner and non-drivers, under a distraction condition?
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Horswill, Mark S.
Total pages 80
Abstract/Summary The current research investigated whether video-based training could improve the hazard perception of learners and non-drivers. Participants were randomly allocated to a training or control condition. Within each group, half of the participants engaged in a distracter task to simulate the cognitive load associated with being a novice driver. Gaze direction was monitored with an eye-tracker and participants' first fixation point and response reaction times were measured in relation to the appearance of each traffic hazard on the computer screen, both pre- and post-training. In line with hypotheses, hazard perception training significantly improved fixation and reaction time responses, and significantly reduced the processing interval between fixation and response production. However, against predictions, engaging in a distracter task did not significantly impede fixation or response reaction times, and did not have a significant effect on the interval between first fixation and response production. Furthermore, no support was found for the prediction that the distracter task would substantially attenuate the training effect, but not eliminate it entirely, as no group differences reached significance. These findings are discussed in relation to novice drivers' situation awareness, with particular reference to the perception, comprehension, and projection components of working memory. Potential implications for graduated licencing systems are also discussed.

 
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Created: Thu, 14 Apr 2011, 08:36:47 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology