The Role of the Parietal Cortex in Multisensory Integration: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study

Harrison Vieth (2010). The Role of the Parietal Cortex in Multisensory Integration: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
HarrisonViethPSYC4071Thesis2010.pdf Copy of Harrison Vieth's BA(Hons) in Psychology Thesis Click to show the corresponding preview/stream application/pdf 1.07MB 10
Author Harrison Vieth
Thesis Title The Role of the Parietal Cortex in Multisensory Integration: A Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Kamke, Marc
Total pages 73
Abstract/Summary Multisensory integration (MSI) is the process in which information from different sensory modalities, such as sight, sound and touch are integrated into a single perceptual event. Multisensory stimulus are detected and reacted to significantly faster than unisensory stimuli, however the precise nature of MSI processes are still in question. The aim of the current study is to determine the neural substrates that are responsible for MSI. We disrupted neural processing in the angular gyrus and supramarginal gyrus using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in order to determine their role in MSI. It was hypothesised that TMS to either or both of these brain sites would affect perception of a multisensory illusion, known as the illusory flash effect, in which a single flash of light is perceived as two flashes when it is accompanied by two beeps. Results demonstrated a marginally significant decrease in susceptibility to the illusion following TMS-induced disruption of the angular gyrus when compared to disruption of a somatosensory cortex control site, an area not implicated in MSI. Further signal detection analyses determined a differential effect of rTMS between brain sites, affecting both multisensory and unisensory processing. Results are discussed with regards to current theory towards MSI, as well as methodological contributions and possibilities for future research.

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 135 Abstract Views, 10 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Thu, 07 Apr 2011, 09:50:25 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology