A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Seminar Version of Workplace Triple P Targeting Work and Family Conflict

Wesley Felsman (2010). A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Seminar Version of Workplace Triple P Targeting Work and Family Conflict Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Wesley Felsman
Thesis Title A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Seminar Version of Workplace Triple P Targeting Work and Family Conflict
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Divna Haslam
Total pages 79
Abstract/Summary The present study is a randomised controlled trial evaluating the efficacy of a low level, seminar version of the Workplace Triple P program. Workplace Triple P seminars are designed specifically for working parents and aim to reduce work and family conflict and enhance occupational and family functioning. The present study adds to the literature by investigating whether a brief, low level parenting intervention is sufficient to produce changes in disruptive child behaviour, parenting practices and parenting confidence. Sixty-two working parents from multiple organisations and occupations with children aged between 18 months and 12 years were randomly assigned to an intervention condition or a waitlist control condition. Parents in the intervention condition attended two one-and-a-half hour seminars where they were taught strategies to prevent and manage stress, as well as positive parenting strategies to prevent and manage disruptive child behaviour. It was hypothesised that, compared to participants in the waitlist control condition, participants in the intervention condition would report: a) lower use of dysfunctional parenting styles, including laxness, over-reactivity, and verbosity; b) lower levels of disruptive child behaviour; c) lower work-to-family conflict; d) lower family-to-work conflict; e) higher work-to-family enrichment; f) lower depression, anxiety and stress; and g) higher levels of efficacy in parenting tasks and in balancing work and family commitments. A series of ANCOVAs and MANCOVAs revealed significant effects for parenting, child behaviour, stress and confidence with managing work and family conflict, however not for parental efficacy, work-to-family conflict, family-to-work conflict or family-to-work enrichment. The implication of these results, strengths and limitations of the study, as well as directions for future research are discussed.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 16:19:13 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology