Hazardous Drinking: The influence of personality, cognition and previous negative alcohol-related experiences

Samantha Lynch (2010). Hazardous Drinking: The influence of personality, cognition and previous negative alcohol-related experiences Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Samantha Lynch
Thesis Title Hazardous Drinking: The influence of personality, cognition and previous negative alcohol-related experiences
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Harnett, Paul H.
Total pages 57
Abstract/Summary Alcohol-related cognitions and impulsivity have both previously been shown to influence alcohol consumption. Drawing on Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory, it has been proposed that impulsivity is a multidimensional construct comprised of Reward Drive and Rash Impulsiveness. Recent research shows that individual differences in both of these dimensions may increase risk for hazardous drinking through separate cognitive mechanisms. However, very little research to date has examined the influence of previous adverse alcohol-related consequences on current drinking behaviour. The primary aim of the present study was to explore the influence of negative experiences resulting from alcohol use, in relation to a cognitive-motivational model of hazardous drinking proposed by Gullo and colleagues (2010). 378 participants completed measures of reward drive, rash impulsiveness, alcohol outcome expectancies, drinking refusal self-efficacy, and a novel measure of negative alcohol-related experiences. Results support the multidimensional nature of impulsivity, and indicate that the relationships between high Reward Drive, Rash Impulsiveness and alcohol misuse are mediated by positive alcohol outcome expectancies and drinking refusal-self efficacy, both leading to increased alcohol consumption. Further, previous serious negative alcohol-related consequences did not moderate the relationships in this model. These findings have theoretical implications for the revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory, and the clinical management of alcohol misuse.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 15:44:07 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology