Face-to-Facebook: A comparison of the effects of ostracism in 21st century social environments

Samantha King (2010). Face-to-Facebook: A comparison of the effects of ostracism in 21st century social environments Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Samantha King
Thesis Title Face-to-Facebook: A comparison of the effects of ostracism in 21st century social environments
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor John McLean
Total pages 75
Abstract/Summary Previous research has found ostracism via internet chat rooms to be less aversive than traditional forms of social ostracism. The aim of the present study was to replicate and extend this finding, by comparing the effects of ostracism in a face-to-face; social networking (Facebook); and chat room environment, using vignettes. Levels of belonging, self-esteem, control, meaningful existence and mood were measured according to the Williams’ need-threat model of ostracism. The findings from previous research were replicated; ostracism in an anonymous online chat room was less damaging than face-to-face ostracism. However this finding does not extend to internet platforms generally. Facebook ostracism was found to be more confronting than the chat room environment, and equally as aversive as face-to-face ostracism on measures of all the four needs. These findings are interpreted to be the result of the anonymity present in chat room settings, while social networking sites, such as Facebook promote personalised profiles and interactions with real-world and pre-existing friends. Suggesting that Facebook is similar to face-to-face relations, at least in this regard. This novel research finding is of considerable importance as Facebook boasts over 500 million active users. While Facebook continues to grow exponentially in popularity, it is important to understand the similarities and differences of current online and face-to-face communications.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 15:40:20 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology