The distractor repetition effect in the attentional blink: Inhibition or facilitated ignoring?

Robert de Lisle (2010). The distractor repetition effect in the attentional blink: Inhibition or facilitated ignoring? Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Robert de Lisle
Thesis Title The distractor repetition effect in the attentional blink: Inhibition or facilitated ignoring?
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Burt, Jennifer S.
Total pages 83
Abstract/Summary It is widely assumed that distractor stimuli in rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) are actively inhibited to aid target identification. The attentional blink (AB), a deficit in the identification of a target (T2) when it occurs within several hundred ms of a prior target (T1), is attenuated when the distractor items immediately preceding and following T1 are identical. Previously, this has been interpreted as a reduction of masking due to cumulative inhibition. However, this view sits at odds with evidence in the word identification literature for easier detection of repeated stimuli. Theoretically, a repetition benefit to distractor detection could make a target easier to distinguish from nearby distractors. This ‘facilitated ignoring’ account of the distractor repetition benefit was compared with the inhibition account in a series of experiments. Results indicate greater activation for repeated than non-repeated distractors, which is inconsistent with the inhibition perspective. However, evidence for the connection between a repetition benefit and facilitated ignoring was deficient.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 15:26:59 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology