The Effect of Presentation Mode on Consumer Brand Confusion in the Marketplace: Developing Foundations for a Valid Measure

Rebecca Giess (2010). The Effect of Presentation Mode on Consumer Brand Confusion in the Marketplace: Developing Foundations for a Valid Measure Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Rebecca Giess
Thesis Title The Effect of Presentation Mode on Consumer Brand Confusion in the Marketplace: Developing Foundations for a Valid Measure
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Humphreys, Michael S.
Total pages 77
Abstract/Summary Amid the ever growing competitive market of product brands, consumer brand confusion has increasingly become a complex issue of interest for both brand owners and consumers; however there is limited research into the associated cognitive psychological variables. Legal measures of brand confusion are methodologically flawed and systematically ignore the effects presentation mode may have on brand confusion. As suggested by eyewitness lineup literature (Steblay et al., 2001), simultaneous presentations may exaggerate confusion. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effects of presentation mode (simultaneous vs. sequential) of supermarket products and instructions given (warning vs. no warning of product absence) on brand confusion. There were three predictions for the focal experiment, of which all related to studied item-absent lineups. Contrary to predictions, more error was produced with the sequential presentation compared to simultaneous. However, in line with predictions, more error was produced with no warning compared to warning, specifically with the simultaneous presentation. Also consistent with hypotheses, the most familiar and similar product to the studied item (critical item) was incorrectly identified more than other products, specifically with the simultaneous presentation and no warning. The implications of these findings and future research required to further address the issue of consumer brand confusion are discussed.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 15:11:11 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology