The brain perceives what the eyes don't see: Monocularly unpaired regions do not resist suppression in absence of an explicit occluder.

Paul Miller (2010). The brain perceives what the eyes don't see: Monocularly unpaired regions do not resist suppression in absence of an explicit occluder. Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Paul Miller
Thesis Title The brain perceives what the eyes don't see: Monocularly unpaired regions do not resist suppression in absence of an explicit occluder.
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Grove, Philip
Total pages 63
Abstract/Summary The extent to which nearer objects or surfaces occlude further ones can differ between eyes, resulting in regions on the distant surface being visible to one eye but not the other. These regions are called monocular occlusion zones. The present study aimed to examine, using phantom stereograms (Gillam & Nakayama, 1999), how binocular rivalry might manifest in monocular occlusion zones not supported by an explicit surface. Over two experiments, 19 participants reported the frequency and duration of monocular feature suppression and perceived depth for three variations of a phantom stereogram. Of these variations only one fully satisfied the geometric relationships consistent with a near occluding surface. It was hypothesised, in line with the geometric consistency of each stimulus, that a greater frequency and duration of depth, and a lower frequency and duration of suppression, would be reported when viewing an arrangement consistent with occlusion, compared to an arrangement inconsistent with occlusion. Results supported predictions of depth perception, showing significant differences where hypothesised. Predictions of suppression were not supported. Instead geometric consistency did not influence overall rivalry. Further analysis did however reveal differences in the manifestation of rivalry as a function of stimulus validity. It was concluded that while geometric validity did not eliminate binocular rivalry in these stimuli, it did alter the features that were suppressed. Conclusions were discussed in light of existing and future research.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 14:52:39 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology