Damned if you do, damned if you don’t: Consequences of stereotype threat for working women

Megan Shochet (2010). Damned if you do, damned if you don’t: Consequences of stereotype threat for working women Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Megan Shochet
Thesis Title Damned if you do, damned if you don’t: Consequences of stereotype threat for working women
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Courtney von Hippel
Total pages 99
Abstract/Summary The current study investigated the consequences for women in leadership who, in a previous study, had reacted against stereotype threat and adopted a masculine communication style. It was predicted that female managers who violated their gender roles by adopting a communication style associated with men would be less favourably evaluated. Ninety-six university students read about situations that managers might face day-to-day. They then read transcripts of responses to these situations from speakers either using a communication style that was more masculine (as a result of reacting against stereotype threat), or using a feminine communication style. Participants evaluated these responses on a number of dimensions. As hypothesised, female managers who adopted a masculine communication style were rated as less warm and likeable than males who communicated in this fashion, and managers both male and female who communicated using a more feminine style. Participants also indicated less willingness to comply with requests given by women who communicated in a masculine fashion. Contrary to expectations, male and female managers were rated as equally competent regardless of communication style. Furthermore, both male and female managers who used a feminine speech style were more favourably evaluated overall than managers using a masculine speech style. Explanations for these findings, as well as theoretical and practical implications are discussed along with directions for future research.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 12:39:35 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology