Spontaneous Facial Reactions towards Emotional Expressions of Ethnic Ingroup and Outgroup Members: Differences in Caucasian-Australian and Japanese Individuals

Mari Horiguchi (2010). Spontaneous Facial Reactions towards Emotional Expressions of Ethnic Ingroup and Outgroup Members: Differences in Caucasian-Australian and Japanese Individuals Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
MariHoriguchiPSYC4071Thesis2010.pdf Copy of Mari Horiguchi's BPsySc Honours Thesis application/pdf 491.01KB 17
Author Mari Horiguchi
Thesis Title Spontaneous Facial Reactions towards Emotional Expressions of Ethnic Ingroup and Outgroup Members: Differences in Caucasian-Australian and Japanese Individuals
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Eric Vanman
Total pages 68
Abstract/Summary Spontaneous facial mimicry, the synchronisation of facial expressions with others, helps to socially bond individuals. This thesis project investigated whether a shared social group membership increases mimicry among individuals, which has been under-researched. Thirty-one Caucasian-Australians and 32 Japanese participants viewed static photographs of facial expressions posed by Caucasian and Japanese persons, while facial muscle activity was measured via electromyography (EMG). A series of mixed measures MANOVAs revealed the distinct activity of cheek, eye, and eyebrow muscles towards each expression (happy, sad, and angry), supporting the occurrence of mimicry. Contrary to prediction, the ethnicity of the actors in the stimuli did not influence participants’ facial responses. However, differences in facial responses did emerge between participants from the two ethnic groups, showing that Japanese participants had greater eye muscle activity towards Japanese faces in general, and greater eyebrow activity towards Caucasian happy faces than Caucasian-Australian participants. No bias was found among Japanese participants on the cheek muscle, implying that they may have socially smiled to mask the bias. Findings imply the necessity in separating mimicry from one’s emotional reactions, both of which may occur spontaneously after exposure to faces. Nevertheless, the study provided an important first step in understanding spontaneous facial reactions which largely influence mimicry and emotional expressions which shape social interactions.

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 12:27:54 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology