The genetic association between dopamine and cholinergic candidate genes and selective spatial attention

Lynn Tan (2010). The genetic association between dopamine and cholinergic candidate genes and selective spatial attention Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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LynnTanPSYC4071Thesis2010.pdf Copy of Lynn Tan's BPsySc Honours Thesis application/pdf 1.15MB 13
Author Lynn Tan
Thesis Title The genetic association between dopamine and cholinergic candidate genes and selective spatial attention
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Mark Bellgrove
Total pages 86
Abstract/Summary In order to allow for effective cognitive processing, selective spatial attention selectively filters and processes stimuli according to their spatial locations and relevance to current behavioural goals. Studies from neuropsychiatric disorders such as ADHD, animal models and pharmacological trials have all provided clues to the underlying neurochemistry of attention. These pieces of evidence converge to suggest the involvement of dopamine and cholinergic neurotransmitters in the modulation of attention. Adhering to a cognitive genetics framework, the current study examines how individual differences in genes encoding the dopamine and cholinergic neurotransmitter systems influence selective spatial attention. Specifically, this study explores how individual differences in spatial attentional performance based on a common exogenous cueing and a novel visual search task varies as a function of DNA variations of catecholamine and cholinergic genes. In a balanced randomized design, 368 healthy adult participants were recruited from the University of Queensland, to perform a battery of attentional tasks aimed at assessing discrete aspects of selective spatial attention. Results suggested the involvement of DAT1 in asymmetries of attention and provided preliminary evidence for the association of CHRM2 T allele to increased impairment of selective spatial attention particularly in situations of increased perceptual load.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 12:11:41 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology