Stereotype threat and women's math performance: The mediating role of self-doubt

Leslie Galaud (). Stereotype threat and women's math performance: The mediating role of self-doubt Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Leslie Galaud
Thesis Title Stereotype threat and women's math performance: The mediating role of self-doubt
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Courtney von Hippel
Total pages 110
Abstract/Summary Previous research has demonstrated that stereotype threat negatively impacts the performance of women on difficult mathematical tests (Spencer, Steele, & Quinn, 1999). The aim of the current study was to replicate stereotype threat effects on the maths performance of female students and explore whether self-doubt mediates this relationship. Self-doubt was measured explicitly and implicitly to investigate whether the implicit measure would have better predictive validity than explicit self-doubt. To control for individual differences, the moderating effects of mathematics identification and stigma-consciousness were also examined. Sixty three undergraduate female students from the University of Queensland were exposed or not exposed to a verbal stereotype threat manipulation. Results unexpectedly revealed that stereotype threat did not impact women's math performance. Moreover, selfdoubt, math identification and stigma-consciousness did not significantly impact the relationship between stereotype threat and performance. However, a number of methodological and theoretical explanations can account for these findings. These results leave an interpretation about the methodology and measures used in this study, as well as the nature of self-doubt, especially implicit self-doubt. Directions for future dedicated to stereotype threat will be discussed in light of the current and past findings, and limitations of the present research.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 11:45:06 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology