Does Xiao-Ling Influence Joan’s Action? How Implicit Racial Prejudice Affects Basic Attention

Katie Veretennikoff (2010). Does Xiao-Ling Influence Joan’s Action? How Implicit Racial Prejudice Affects Basic Attention Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Katie Veretennikoff
Thesis Title Does Xiao-Ling Influence Joan’s Action? How Implicit Racial Prejudice Affects Basic Attention
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Eric Vanman
Total pages 76
Abstract/Summary Inhibition of return (IOR) is the phenomenon whereby people are slower to respond to previously attended to targets or locations. Prior research demonstrated this with individuals acting in isolation as well as in dyadic interactions. The purpose of the present experiment was to replicate and extend previous research by investigating whether IOR can be affected by an interaction with a member of the racial outgroup. Furthermore, the present experiment also investigated whether implicit racial prejudice could influence the magnitude of IOR. A total of 73 participants took part in the present experiment, which utilised facial electromyography to measure participants’ implicit racial attitudes, as well as a movement apparatus to measure reaction time as an index of inhibition of return. In line with previous research, reaction times were found to be significantly slower when participants responded to same targets compared to different targets, as well as for the other person condition compared to the self condition. Two novel predictions were also investigated in this experiment. The results indicated that response times were not affected by interacting with a different-race partner and implicit racial prejudice was not related to the magnitude of the between-person IOR effects. However, the magnitude of the within-person IOR effects was found to be affected by implicit racial prejudice for participants interacting with a different-race partner. Overall, the findings highlight the possibility that outgroup members are paid more attention than ingroup members, especially for more racially prejudiced individuals. Implications for anti-prejudice interventions are discussed.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 11:28:53 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology