The effect of vitamin D supplementation on mental health outcomes and selected executive functions: A double blind randomised control trial

Jonathan Phan (2010). The effect of vitamin D supplementation on mental health outcomes and selected executive functions: A double blind randomised control trial Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
JonathanPhanWeiMingPSYC4071Thesis2010.pdf Copy of Jonathan Phan's BA(Hons) in Psychology Thesis Click to show the corresponding preview/stream application/pdf 430.94KB 7
Author Jonathan Phan
Thesis Title The effect of vitamin D supplementation on mental health outcomes and selected executive functions: A double blind randomised control trial
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Mark Bellgrove
Total pages 90
Abstract/Summary Previous research has been indicative of a potential role of vitamin D in mental health. This study utilised a double blind randomised control trial design to investigate the effect of vitamin D supplementation on mental health outcomes as well as selected executive function. This study hypothesised that compared to the placebo group, participants in the treatment group (vitamin D supplementation) would demonstrate: (i)a reduction in symptoms of depression, (ii)a reduction in symptoms of anxiety, and (iii)an improvement in performance on selected executive functions (updating working memory, cognitive flexibility and response inhibition). 128 participants, aged 18 to 30 were supplemented for six weeks with either 5,000 IU of vitamin D or a placebo. Analysis revealed no statistically significant differences between treatment and placebo groups on the measures of interest. This suggests that vitamin D supplementation has no direct causal relationship on symptoms of depression and anxiety as well as executive function in nonclinical adults.

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 154 Abstract Views, 7 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 11:07:54 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology