Are we born to drink? The Role of BAS, Emotional Dysregulation and Drinking-Refusal Self-Efficacy in predicting Alcohol Consumption

Ng, Jasvinda (2010). Are we born to drink? The Role of BAS, Emotional Dysregulation and Drinking-Refusal Self-Efficacy in predicting Alcohol Consumption Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Ng, Jasvinda
Thesis Title Are we born to drink? The Role of BAS, Emotional Dysregulation and Drinking-Refusal Self-Efficacy in predicting Alcohol Consumption
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Harnett, Paul H.
Total pages 94
Abstract/Summary The role of personality theory, in particular Gray and McNaughton’s (2000) Revised Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (r-RST), has found that the Behavioural Approach System (BAS) predicts drinking behaviour. The present study attempted to replicate the results of previous studies that have found a relationship between BAS and alcohol consumption. This study also extended previous research by investigating people’s ability to regulate their emotions, which is assumed to be related to their socialization experiences. Participants were asked to report retrospectively on the way their parents helped them manage emotions when they were children as well as their current emotional regulation strategies. In addition, previous research has suggested drinking refusal self-efficacy (DRSE) to be a mechanism to mediate risky drinking. Our study also examined whether DRSE is related to personality and/or emotion regulation. Three hundred and thirty four first year psychology students completed the questionnaire online in a computer lab. Another sixty eight participants external to the university completed the online survey anonymously. It was found that both BAS and emotion regulation ability predicted alcohol consumption. Neither moderating nor mediating effect was found between the two predictors. After the effect of BAS was controlled, emotion regulation still significantly predicted alcohol consumption. Moreover, global reward, global punish and global magnify socialization strategies predicted individuals’ development of emotion dysregulation in adulthood. Furthermore, DRSE was found to be related to both personality and emotion regulation. The findings of the present study provide clinical implications for the development of therapeutic interventions targeting substance abuse disorders.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 10:02:09 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology