You move me in mysterious ways: Visual cues in perception of biological motion and how they affect the movement of the observer

Jacqueline Lester (2010). You move me in mysterious ways: Visual cues in perception of biological motion and how they affect the movement of the observer Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Jacqueline Lester
Thesis Title You move me in mysterious ways: Visual cues in perception of biological motion and how they affect the movement of the observer
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Ada Kritikos
Total pages 68
Abstract/Summary How does observing the behaviour of others influence our own behaviour? The literature appears divided regarding the influence of form and motion of the model on the movement of the observer. This thesis seeks to investigate how manipulation of form influences the movement parameters of the observer. In the first study, participants viewed video stimuli of a hand performing either pantomimed or goal-directed actions and were required to perform pantomimed actions in response to the stimulus. In the second study, participants viewed video stimuli of real hands, red hands and light-point hands performing either pantomimed or goal-directed reach-to-grasp actions. Participants were instructed to modify their reaching actions based on whether the hand was real or not. Movement parameters such as time to initiate movement and peak grasp were recorded. There were three hypotheses in experiment 1. First, it was predicted movement initiated in response to real hands would be faster than red hands. Second, it was predicted that compatible actions would have faster initiation times compared with incompatible actions. Finally, peak grasps formed in response to goal-directed actions would be larger than pantomimed actions. There were also three hypotheses for experiment 2. First, it was predicted movement initiated in response to real or red hands would be faster than point-light hands. Second, it was predicted that goal-directed actions would have faster initiation times compared with pantomimed actions. Finally, peak grasps formed in response to light-point hands would be larger than responses to real or red hands. The results suggest both the form and motion of the model influence the movement of the observer. The current study has important implications to understanding how we learn through observation.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 09:22:29 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology