Effects of violence and of approval from group authorities on support for a protest rally

Jack Leggett (2010). Effects of violence and of approval from group authorities on support for a protest rally Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Jack Leggett
Thesis Title Effects of violence and of approval from group authorities on support for a protest rally
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Louis, Winnifred
Total pages 76
Abstract/Summary Two experiments examined responses to fabricated newspaper reports about a protest. In Experiment 1, 58 females and 49 males (mean age: 20.28) read about a protest by farmers who were violent or non-violent, and whose actions were approved of or not approved of by authorities from the farming community. Participants rated their anger at the protestors, the legitimacy of the protest, their attitude to the farming community, and their attitudinal support for the protest aims. The study found that violence produced greater anger, but only in the approval condition. Experiment 2, with 53 female and 33 male participants (mean age: 20.28), added measures of moral outrage and behavioural support. Experiment 2 found an effect of violence on anger, revealed legitimacy as a mediator of this effect, and found that legitimacy was correlated with behavioural support. The findings provided some support for hypotheses, but their interpretation was hindered by a crossover effect in the manipulations such that participants seemed to infer violence from the presence of disapproval.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 09:08:45 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology