The Importance of Parental Emotion Regulation on Child Outcomes: Implications for Parenting Programs.

Genevieve Smith (2010). The Importance of Parental Emotion Regulation on Child Outcomes: Implications for Parenting Programs. Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Genevieve Smith
Thesis Title The Importance of Parental Emotion Regulation on Child Outcomes: Implications for Parenting Programs.
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Harnett, Paul H.
Total pages 75
Abstract/Summary Recently there has been a trend toward exploring the role emotions play in parenting for both the child and the parent (Zeman, Cassano, Perry-Parrish, & Stegall, 2006). The majority of these studies have been focused on child emotion socialisation (O'Neal & Magai, 2005), with the parental influence being explored through parental meta-emotion (Gottman, Katz, & Hooven, 1996). This study was interested in adding to this literature in the topic of parental emotion regulation investigating the role of parental emotion regulation plays on child outcomes. 113 Participant completed Questionnaires which were administered to parents around Brisbane and through online forums. These questionnaires looked at discipline techniques (in particular time-out and corporal punishment), parental emotion dysregulation and a variety of child outcome including behaviour difficulties, behaviour regulation and emotion regulation. Results found the discipline techniques were directly associated with child outcomes and that emotion dysregulation was directly related to child outcomes. A moderating effect was found with emotion regulation and timeout use such that high dysregulation attenuated the effects of time-out. In addition high time out usage in low dysregulated parents led to higher child behaviour difficulties. This study concluded that emotion regulation plays a vital role in child outcomes and should be adapted into parenting programs to optimise program success.

 
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Created: Wed, 06 Apr 2011, 08:23:18 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology