Can You See It? An investigation into the effects of implicit temporal information and our ability to allocate attentional resources.

Brown-Kenyon, Daniel (2010). Can You See It? An investigation into the effects of implicit temporal information and our ability to allocate attentional resources. Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Brown-Kenyon, Daniel
Thesis Title Can You See It? An investigation into the effects of implicit temporal information and our ability to allocate attentional resources.
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Troy Visser
Total pages 62
Abstract/Summary We live in a visually complex world, with more information available than we are able to process simultaneously. While many laboratory experiments have confirmed these limitations, relatively little work has investigated potential strategies to overcome them. The present paper aimed to investigate if we are better able to allocate our attention, in order to overcome some of the limitations of visual perception. In experiment one, 22 participants viewed a stream of number distractors, and two letter targets in a traditional Attentional blink paradigm. Within one condition there was increasing probability that the second target would appear at different points in time. Whereas in the other condition the probability of the second target occurring was held constant across trials. The participants were required to correctly identify both the first and second targets. The results indicated that there was no difference in participant accuracy between the two conditions. In the second experiment we created a more sensitive measure to address issues raised within the first. 36 Participants took part in a similar paradigm to the first experiment. However, the dependent measure of reaction time to the second target was included. The results found a general trend, which indicated that the participants were able to use implicit information to improve their performance.

 
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Created: Tue, 05 Apr 2011, 13:12:43 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology