What 'they' say has implications for 'our' behaviour: The role of legitimacy appraisals when responding to gender discrimination.

Anne Sheldon (2010). What 'they' say has implications for 'our' behaviour: The role of legitimacy appraisals when responding to gender discrimination. Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Anne Sheldon
Thesis Title What 'they' say has implications for 'our' behaviour: The role of legitimacy appraisals when responding to gender discrimination.
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Jetten, Jolanda
Total pages 56
Language eng
Subjects 380100 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The present studies general aim was to explore the effects of discrimination on group commitment and self esteem. In particular, we looked at how consequences of discrimination may be dependent on evaluations of legitimacy, that is, whether the discrimination is evaluated to be legitimate or illegitimate, and by whom the evaluation is made by. It was hypothesised that legitimacy claims made by the out-group would not have the same impact or outcome as legitimacy claims made by the out-group. Specifically, we explored the effects of legitimacy claims from both men and women upon a women's individual and collective identity, and whether this then influenced collective action intentions and impacted collective self esteem. Thus, a 2 (appraised legitimacy of discrimination by men) X 2 (appraised legitimacy of discrimination by women) between subject design was used. Confirming predictions drawn from social identity theory, we found that perceiving other women appraising discrimination as legitimate undermined collective action intention and collective self esteem the most. Whilst a male legitimate claim resulted in higher individual mobility, an interactive effect was found for group identification. It was found that group identity was only enhanced when there was a legitimate appraisal by men, yet an illegitimate appraisal by women. The study highlights the importance of both the in-group and out-group's role in responses to discriminatory treatment.

 
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Created: Tue, 05 Apr 2011, 11:12:39 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology