Do Psychosocial Perceptions Predict Conflict within a Boy's Boarding School Environment? An Assessment of Stage Environment Fit Theory

Amy Jones (2010). Do Psychosocial Perceptions Predict Conflict within a Boy's Boarding School Environment? An Assessment of Stage Environment Fit Theory Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Amy Jones
Thesis Title Do Psychosocial Perceptions Predict Conflict within a Boy's Boarding School Environment? An Assessment of Stage Environment Fit Theory
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Julie Hodges
Total pages 99
Abstract/Summary The present study investigated a novel model, examining the predictive role of perceived environment, optimism, mental health and coping mechanism on an adolescent outcome measure of conflict in 69 male boarders aged 12 to 18 years. The model tested the Stage Environment Fit Theory (SEFT) of boarder adjusted, premised on boarder perceptions of how adequately the surrounding environment provided for their needs. Self report questionnaire packets containing relevant measures were administered to one all male boarding school at two time points. A series of regression analyses investigated the validity of the predictive model cross-sectionally and longitudinally, with emphasis on the unique contribution of individual predictors. Complex interactions between intra-personal characteristics such as optimism and coping strategy were additionally investigated. Based on SEFT, it was hypothesized that more negative perceptions of the boarding environment would predict lower levels of adolescent adjustment, as conceptualised via level of conflict. Additionally, it was hypothesized that increased use of adaptive coping mechanisms, higher levels of optimism and lower levels of mental health difficulties would predict lower levels of conflict. Predictive relationships were expected to hold across time. Results supported the validity of the model within a boarding school population. With the exception of perceived environment, all other unique predictors did not reach significance, however, trends did establish directional associations in line with predictions. Deficiencies in power attributed to small sample size are likely at fault, necessitating further investigation with larger samples. Utilizing these findings, a stratified model concerning assessments and interventions at multiple levels of the boarding school populations is discussed.

 
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Created: Tue, 05 Apr 2011, 10:47:33 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology