I Like the Way You Move: How observation of human movement influences the movements of the observer

Amelia-Rose Read (2010). I Like the Way You Move: How observation of human movement influences the movements of the observer Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Amelia-Rose Read
Thesis Title I Like the Way You Move: How observation of human movement influences the movements of the observer
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Ada Kritikos
Total pages 73
Abstract/Summary Humans are able to understand the actions and intentions of others effortlessly. More than this, our own actions are influenced by observation those around us. This robust phenomenon is underpinned by the perception of biological motion. The current study aimed at investigating whether the visual appearance or the motion parameters are more important when determining the biological nature in a model. Experiment one investigated the impact of the appearance of the hand of a human model, in particular, variations in the parameters of the observer were analyses. Participants were required to make pantomime reach-to-grasp actions whilst viewing a stimulus which consisted of either a real hand or a real hand rendered red. The stimulus hand, made reach-to-grasp actions that were both congruent and incongruent to the participants‟ movements. Motion parameters such as initiation time, peak grasp and movement velocity were compared between hand type conditions. Results indicated that the observers‟ movements were generally more efficient when observing congruent movements compared with incongruent movements. Experiment two investigated the impact of the appearance and the kinematics of the model, in particular, processing was directed towards the kinematic parameters of the model. The model‟s hands were real, a real hand rendered red, or the point-light display of the real hand performing reach-to-grasp actions. Participants were required to make a pantomime reach to grasp action that was task relevant to the stimuli. Results illustrated a distinct pattern of results for point light displays compared to the real and red hands, such that congruent actions facilitated participants‟ movement initiation time compared with incongruent actions, and the opposite effect for the real and red hand conditions. Results suggest that the visual appearance and motion parameters, are both important aspects for determining the biological nature in a model, however the individual importance of each may be context dependant. Results are discussed with regards to ideomotor priming, appearance and the motion of the model.

 
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Created: Mon, 04 Apr 2011, 16:16:39 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology