Community's Attitudes and Expectations of Care for those with a Disability

Infantino, Alyssa (2010). Community's Attitudes and Expectations of Care for those with a Disability Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Infantino, Alyssa
Thesis Title Community's Attitudes and Expectations of Care for those with a Disability
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Cuskelly, Monica M.
Total pages 87
Abstract/Summary Individuals with intellectual disability and those with serious mental illness are now living longer than previously and it is predicted that most will outlive their parents who are typically their primary caregiver. It seems likely that siblings will face pressure to assume the role of the caregiver to their adult brother or sister with a disability when parents are no longer able to fulfil this role. Community expectations of siblings may influence service provision, but currently there is no information about community expectations of adult siblings. A possible influence on expectations of siblings is attitudes towards those with a disability. Thus, it was hypothesised that those who had more negative attitudes would expect siblings to take more responsibility. Research has illustrated previous contact, age, gender, and education influence attitudes towards individuals with a disability, thus were examined with respect to community members attitudes. Members of the community were asked to complete a survey on their expectations of the responsibility of the siblings to provide care and attitudes towards those with intellectual disability and those with serious mental illness. Results found there were more stigmatising attitudes towards individuals with intellectual disability, with previous contact influencing attitudes towards both disabilities. Gender only influenced attitudes towards individuals with serious mental illness, while age and education had no effect on either. Unexpectedly, expectations of siblings to provide care and attitudes towards those with a disability were not related. A number of implications are explained.

 
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Created: Mon, 04 Apr 2011, 16:07:58 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology