Towards large-scale prediction of Lolium rigidum emergence. II: Correlation between dormancy and herbicide resistance levels suggests an impact of cropping systems

Owen, M. J., Michael, P. J., Renton, M., Steadman, K. J. and Powles, S. B. (2011) Towards large-scale prediction of Lolium rigidum emergence. II: Correlation between dormancy and herbicide resistance levels suggests an impact of cropping systems. Weed Research, 51 2: 133-141. doi:10.1111/j.1365-3180.2010.00835.x


Author Owen, M. J.
Michael, P. J.
Renton, M.
Steadman, K. J.
Powles, S. B.
Title Towards large-scale prediction of Lolium rigidum emergence. II: Correlation between dormancy and herbicide resistance levels suggests an impact of cropping systems
Formatted title
Towards large-scale prediction of Lolium rigidum emergence. II: Correlation between dormancy and herbicide resistance levels suggests an impact of cropping systems
Journal name Weed Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0043-1737
1365-3180
Publication date 2011-04
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1365-3180.2010.00835.x
Volume 51
Issue 2
Start page 133
End page 141
Total pages 9
Editor E. J. P. Marshall
Place of publication Oxford, U.K.
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study investigated a possible link between seed dormancy and herbicide resistance status of Lolium rigidum (annual or rigid ryegrass). Mature seeds were collected from 406 populations across the 14-million hectare grain belt of southern Western Australia. For each population, initial dormancy and change in dormancy over a 6-month period were measured, and resistance status of seedlings to four herbicides (diclofop-methyl, sethoxydim, clethodim and sulfometuron-methyl) was assessed. Greater seed dormancy correlated with higher levels of herbicide resistance for all four herbicides tested. The herbicides represented two modes of action (acetyl CoA carboxylase- and acetolactate synthase inhibitors) and a contrast of generalist (metabolic) and target-site mutation mechanisms. The coexistence of dormancy and herbicide resistance is suggested to be an adaptation to decades of intense cropping; the plants that are most likely to successfully reproduce are those that exhibit delayed germination (avoiding pre-seeding weed control strategies) and possess herbicide resistance (surviving subsequent in-crop herbicide application). We propose that herbicide resistance status may have a role as a predictive tool in modelling dormancy in L. rigidum at a large spatial scale.
Keyword Annual ryegrass
Survey
Weed management
Mediterranean-type climate
Seed dormancy
Germination
Herbicide resistance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online: 8 DEC 2010

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2012 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 19 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 04 Apr 2011, 12:04:23 EST by Charna Kovacevic on behalf of School of Pharmacy