From traumatic brain injury to posttraumatic epilepsy: What animal models tell us about the process and treatment options

Pitkanen, Asla, Immonen, Riikka J., Grohn, Olli H. J. and Kharatishvili, Irina (2009) From traumatic brain injury to posttraumatic epilepsy: What animal models tell us about the process and treatment options. Epilepsia, 50 s2: 21-29. doi:10.1111/j.1528-1167.2008.02007.x


Author Pitkanen, Asla
Immonen, Riikka J.
Grohn, Olli H. J.
Kharatishvili, Irina
Title From traumatic brain injury to posttraumatic epilepsy: What animal models tell us about the process and treatment options
Journal name Epilepsia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0013-9580
1528-1167
Publication date 2009-02
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2008.02007.x
Volume 50
Issue s2
Start page 21
End page 29
Total pages 9
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract A large number of animal models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are already available for studies on mechanisms and experimental treatments of TBI. Immediate and early seizures have been described in many of these models with focal or mixed type (both gray and white matter damage) injury. Recent long-term video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring studies have demonstrated that TBI produced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in rats results in the development of late seizures, that is, epilepsy. These animals develop hippocampal alterations that are well described in status epilepticus-induced spontaneous seizure models and human posttraumatic epilepsy (PTE). In addition, these rats have damage ipsilaterally in the cortical injury site and thalamus. Although studies in the trauma field provide a large amount of information about the molecular and cellular alterations corresponding to the immediate and early phases of PTE, chronic studies relevant to the epileptogenesis phase are sparse. Moreover, despite the multiple preclinical pharmacologic and cell therapy trials, there is no information available describing whether these therapeutic approaches aimed at improving posttraumatic recovery would also affect the development of lowered seizure threshold and epilepsy. To make progress, there is an obvious need for information exchange between the trauma and epilepsy fields. In addition, the inclusion of epilepsy as an outcome measure in preclinical trials aiming at improving somatomotor and cognitive recovery after TBI would provide valuable information about possible new avenues for antiepileptogenic interventions and disease modification after TBI. © 2009 International League Against Epilepsy.
Keyword Antiepileptic drug
Epileptogenesis
Fluid-percussion injury
Recovery
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Special Issue: Posttraumatic Epilepsy: Treatable Epileptogenesis

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: Centre for Advanced Imaging Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 30 Mar 2011, 15:54:14 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of Centre for Advanced Imaging