Oral health students as reflective practitioners: changing patterns of student clinical reflections over a period of 12 months

Tsang, Annetta K. L. (2012) Oral health students as reflective practitioners: changing patterns of student clinical reflections over a period of 12 months. Journal of Dental Hygiene, 86 2: 120-129.

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Author Tsang, Annetta K. L.
Title Oral health students as reflective practitioners: changing patterns of student clinical reflections over a period of 12 months
Journal name Journal of Dental Hygiene   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1043-254X
1553-0205
Publication date 2012-03
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 86
Issue 2
Start page 120
End page 129
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chicago, IL, United States
Publisher American Dental Hygienists' Association
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the levels
of reflection shown by bachelor of oral health students in relation
to their clinical and professional practice.
Methods: Reflective learning was embedded as a topic in the
oral health curriculum within the discipline of dental hygiene
practice. Reflective journal writing was integrated with clinical
practice and linked with assessment requirements. Students’
reflective writing was analyzed thematically to elucidate levels
of reflection based on Boud’s 4 Rs of Reflection (review, react,
relate and respond) over a period of 12 months. Differences in
the levels of reflection at different time intervals were examined.
Results: Students’ ability to critically reflect improved over
the period of 12 months. The predominant level of reflection
changed from primarily descriptive and superficial at the start of
the academic year to primarily critical and relational by the end.
As expected, the highest level of critical reflection (respond)
occurred infrequently, although it became more frequent as the
academic year progressed.
Conclusion: Bachelor of oral health students do reflect critically.
Regular reflective writing contributed to the development
of critical reflective skills in the context of clinical and professional
development.
Keyword Reflective learning
Critical reflection
Dental hygiene practice
Oral health
Clinical experiences
Evolving professional
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Dentistry Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 25 Mar 2011, 22:54:34 EST by Dr Annetta Tsang on behalf of School of Dentistry