Underground collision avoidance: From technology to solution

Dudley, John and McAree, Peter R. (2010). Underground collision avoidance: From technology to solution. In: Paul Lever and Peter Knights, Proceedings of the 2010 Australian Mining Technology Conference: "Technology Changing the Mining Business Footprint". 2010 Australian Mining Technology Conference: "Technology changing the mining business footprint", Perth, WA, Australia, (9-19). 13-15 September 2010.

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Author Dudley, John
McAree, Peter R.
Title of paper Underground collision avoidance: From technology to solution
Conference name 2010 Australian Mining Technology Conference: "Technology changing the mining business footprint"
Conference location Perth, WA, Australia
Conference dates 13-15 September 2010
Convener CRCMining
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 2010 Australian Mining Technology Conference: "Technology Changing the Mining Business Footprint"
Place of Publication Pinjarra Hills, QLD, Australia
Publisher CRCMining
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781921522277
1921522275
Editor Paul Lever
Peter Knights
Start page 9
End page 19
Total pages 11
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Approximately one quarter of fatalities in both the Australian and US mining industries can be attributed to vehicle accidents. While the total number of fatalities has shown a downward trend over the past decade, the number arising from vehicle accidents has remained moreor- less constant. These trends suggest that safety initiatives in mining have been successful in reducing overall deaths in the industry but that the dangers associated with human-vehicle interaction have not been adequately addressed. In the last five years there has been a proliferation of collision avoidance systems designed for surface mining applications. Many of these systems have been introduced with varying degrees of success across diverse operations but in general, wide acceptance by the industry has not been achieved. The development and implementation of systems specifically tailored for underground mining operations, where vehicle related fatalities are equally common, has occurred at a far more subdued pace. There are a great many challenges, unique to the underground application, confronting both the underlying technology as well as its translation into a useful solution. This paper examines the current state of collision avoidance systems applied to the underground mining context and attempts to outline some sensible steps that may assist reducing the number of fatalities.
© CRCMining 2010
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 25 Mar 2011, 16:06:42 EST by Deanna Mahony on behalf of School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering