Soil factors affecting vegetation establishment after sand mining on North Stradbroke Island

Pillai-McGarry, Usha P., Lockhart, Craig and Mulligan, David (2010). Soil factors affecting vegetation establishment after sand mining on North Stradbroke Island. In: Robert Gilkes and Nattaporn Prakongkep, Proceedings of the 19th World Congress of Soil Science: Soil solutions for a changing world. 19th World Congress of Soil Science: Soil solutions for a changing world, Brisbane, Australia, (48-51). 1-6 August 2010.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ239014_fulltext.pdf ERA evidence - not publicly available application/pdf 256.65KB 0
Author Pillai-McGarry, Usha P.
Lockhart, Craig
Mulligan, David
Title of paper Soil factors affecting vegetation establishment after sand mining on North Stradbroke Island
Conference name 19th World Congress of Soil Science: Soil solutions for a changing world
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 1-6 August 2010
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 19th World Congress of Soil Science: Soil solutions for a changing world
Place of Publication Brisbane, Australia
Publisher International Union of Soil Sciences
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780646537832
Editor Robert Gilkes
Nattaporn Prakongkep
Start page 48
End page 51
Total pages 4
Language eng
Abstract/Summary A study was undertaken to investigate causes for poor native vegetation establishment and erosion in rehabilitated sand dunes following sand mining at North Stradbroke Island, Australia. The problem was mainly associated with the use of topsoil from old rehabilitated sites from earlier mining ventures (designated as pre-mined topsoil) as opposed to using topsoil from unmined native areas (designated as unmined topsoil). The approach was to characterise the soil properties pertinent to soil erosion and measured poor plant growth from two rehabilitated areas of similar age but using the different topsoils, pre-mined and unmined. Results indicated that the greatest soil physical difference between the topsoil areas was the severity and frequency of water repellency (ratings 6-severe and 5- moderate to severe) that occurred in the pre-mined topsoil. Ca and Mg contents were also lower in the pre-mined topsoil area compared to that of the unmined topsoil, as was the lower Ca:Al ratio (<1), indicating a possible impact of poor cation balance on vegetation growth. Despite differences in surface stability and vegetation growth, soil carbon was not a differentiating factor between the unmined and pre-mined topsoil areas.
Keyword Mined land rehabilitation
Water repellency
Ca:Al ratio
Dune rehabilitation
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published on DVD

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: Centre for Mined Land Rehabilitation Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 25 Mar 2011, 15:23:26 EST by Dr Usha Pillai-mcgarry on behalf of Centre For Mined Land Rehabilitation