Educational technologies and learning objectives

Tibbits, Gregory, Jolly, Lesley, Kavanagh, Lydia and O'Moore, Liza (2010). Educational technologies and learning objectives. In: Proceedings of the 21st Annual Australasian Association for Engineering Education Conference (AaeE2010) : Past, Present, Future. 21st Annual AaeE Conference, Sydney, NSW, Australia, (518-525). 5-8 December 2010.

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Author Tibbits, Gregory
Jolly, Lesley
Kavanagh, Lydia
O'Moore, Liza
Title of paper Educational technologies and learning objectives
Conference name 21st Annual AaeE Conference
Conference location Sydney, NSW, Australia
Conference dates 5-8 December 2010
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 21st Annual Australasian Association for Engineering Education Conference (AaeE2010) : Past, Present, Future
Place of Publication Sydney, NSW, Australia
Publisher University of Technology Sydney
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780646546100
Start page 518
End page 525
Total pages 8
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Technologies such as online tools, simulations, and remote labs are often used in learning and training environments, both academic and vocational, to deliver content in an accessible manner. They promise efficiencies of scale, flexibility of delivery, and face validity for a generation brought up on electronic devices. However, learning outcomes are not the same in all circumstances and sometimes contextual and cultural factors can lead to the failure of a technology which has been successful elsewhere. This paper draws on studies of the use of simulators and simulations within the vocational environment of the rail industry and uses Realistic Evaluation to assess and specify what works for whom in what circumstances. It is postulated that this evaluation framework could be a useful tool in the assessment of educational technologies used in engineering education. © Tibbits et. al., 2010
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 25 Mar 2011, 13:59:19 EST by Jeannette Watson on behalf of School of Civil Engineering