Phosphorus sorption in soils and sediments: Implications for phosphate supply to a subtropical river in southeast Queensland, Australia

Kerr, Jason G., Burford, Michele, Olley, Jon and Udy, James (2011) Phosphorus sorption in soils and sediments: Implications for phosphate supply to a subtropical river in southeast Queensland, Australia. Biogeochemistry, 102 1-3: 73-85. doi:10.1007/s10533-010-9422-9

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Author Kerr, Jason G.
Burford, Michele
Olley, Jon
Udy, James
Title Phosphorus sorption in soils and sediments: Implications for phosphate supply to a subtropical river in southeast Queensland, Australia
Journal name Biogeochemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-2563
1573-515X
Publication date 2011-01
Year available 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10533-010-9422-9
Volume 102
Issue 1-3
Start page 73
End page 85
Total pages 13
Editor Katja Lajtha
R. W. Howarth
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Phosphorus (P) is often a key limiting nutrient in freshwater systems, and excessive P can result in algal blooms, with flow-on effects to aquatic food webs. P sorption is an important process in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems whereby phosphate (PO43−) is exchanged between liquid and solid phases. This study shows that differences in the concentration of PO43− in a subtropical river system during high and low flow can be attributed to differences in P sorption characterises of its catchment soils and sediments. The sediments have lower Equilibrium Phosphate Concentrations (EPC0) and higher binding energy (Kd); the surface soils have higher EPC0 and higher easily desorbed P (NH4Cl–P). A comparison of filterable reactive phosphorus (frP) in water samples collected at high and low flows, with soil and sediment EPC0, suggested that during event flows, the high EPC0 and NH4Cl–P of surface soils is producing a net movement of PO43− from the soil/sediment system into runoff and stream flow. At baseflow, there is more likely a net movement of PO43− into the riverbed sediments. This has important implications for management actions aimed at reducing P loads to river systems and downstream water storages, namely the need to increase the infiltration of rainfall to decrease the amount of PO43− being flushed from the surface soil.
© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2010
Keyword Equilibrium phosphate concentration
Phosphorus
Rivers
Sediment
Soil
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 12 March 2010

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
Official 2011 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 18 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 24 Mar 2011, 13:53:31 EST by Jeannette Watson on behalf of School of Civil Engineering