Is in vitro fermentation of starch by porcine ileal and fecal microflora altered by the presence of grapeseed extract?

Wang, Dongjie, D'Arcy, Bruce, Willilams, Barbara and Ferruzi, Mario (2010). Is in vitro fermentation of starch by porcine ileal and fecal microflora altered by the presence of grapeseed extract?. In: 2010 Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting and Food Expo, Chicago, IL, United States, (). 17-20 July 2010.

Author Wang, Dongjie
D'Arcy, Bruce
Willilams, Barbara
Ferruzi, Mario
Title of paper Is in vitro fermentation of starch by porcine ileal and fecal microflora altered by the presence of grapeseed extract?
Conference name 2010 Institute of Food Technologists Annual Meeting and Food Expo
Conference location Chicago, IL, United States
Conference dates 17-20 July 2010
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Published abstract
Open Access Status
Total pages 1
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Grape seed extract (GSE) may have health benefits in terms of the intestinal microflora. Little information is available. Using Gelose80 (starch=STR) as a source of microflora energy, we hypothesized that in vitro fermentation by porcine intestinal bacteria would be altered by GSE. We used both ileal and fecal digesta from pigs, to represent the microflora of the small and large intestines. Ileal and fecal inocula were added separately to pre-warmed, sealed bottles, containing anaerobic medium and starch, with or without GSE. Anaerobic fermentation was at 39°C for 96 hours. Gas production was measured intermittently, and end-point samples collected at 96 hours. These samples were analyzed for SCFA using GC. The DMCV was higher for the fecal compared with the ileal fermentation. There was also a significant interaction, so that addition of GSE decreased the gas production for ileal compared with fecal inoculum. Generally speaking, there was no difference between SCFA values for both ileal samples and the STR_Fec sample. However, addition of GSE led to a significant reduction in SCFA values for the fecal inoculum. Ile-ileal inoculum; Fec-fecal inoculum; DMCV-gas volume/gram DM Feces contains more, and a much greater diversity of microflora than the ileal digesta. Therefore, reduced SCFA with added GSE to the faecal inoculum, suggests that of the larger number of fecal species present, some of the most active ones must be sensitive to the GSE or its metabolites. In terms of SCFA production, the ileal microflora appear to be more robust. Future work will determine whether GSE may have antibiotic properties.
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Abstract No. 296-32

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Thu, 24 Mar 2011, 10:53:53 EST by Mrs Ann Dunn on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation