A surface mulch of crop residues enhances suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes in sugarcane soils

Stirling, G. R., Halpin, N. V. and Bell, M. J. (2011) A surface mulch of crop residues enhances suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes in sugarcane soils. Nematropica, 41 1: 109-121.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Stirling, G. R.
Halpin, N. V.
Bell, M. J.
Title A surface mulch of crop residues enhances suppressiveness to plant-parasitic nematodes in sugarcane soils
Journal name Nematropica   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0099-5444
Publication date 2011-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 41
Issue 1
Start page 109
End page 121
Total pages 13
Place of publication Auburn, AL, United States
Publisher Organization of Nematologists of Tropical America
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Abstract A surface mulch of crop residues enhances suppressiveness to plantparasitic nematodes in sugarcane soils. Nematropica 41:109-121. Most Australian sugarcane crops are harvested green, with the crop residues left behind after harvest remaining on the soil surface as mulch, a process known as green cane trash blanketing. Sampling in trash-blanketed sugarcane fields showed that roots were present to a depth of 150 cm, but that more than 90% of the root biomass was in the upper 30 cm of the soil profile. Many of these roots were concentrated in a layer just below the trash blanket and they were unusually healthy, presumably because population densities of Pratylenchus zeae/g root were 5-16 times lower than in roots a few cm further down the profile. Results of a microcosm experiment indicated that mulching soil with sugarcane residue increased soil C, microbial activity and numbers of free-living nematodes, and enhanced suppressiveness to Meloidogyne javanica and P. zeae to a greater extent than incorporating the residue into soil. It is hypothesized that roots immediately beneath the trash blanket remain healthy because C inputs from root exudates and organic matter on the soil surface sustain a soil food web capable of suppressing root pathogens, including plant-parasitic nematodes.
Keyword Biological control
Mulch
Meloidogyne javanica
Organic amendments
Plant-parasitic nematodes
Pratylenchus zeae
Root distribution
Sugarcane
Suppression
Trash blanket
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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Created: Wed, 23 Mar 2011, 09:14:34 EST by Samantha Richards on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation