War, democracy and culture in Classical Athens

Pritchard, David (2010). War, democracy and culture in Classical Athens. In: Neil O'Sullivan, ASCS 31 [2010] Proceedings: Refereed Papers from the 31st Conference of the Australasian Society for Classical Studies. ASCS 31 [2010], Perth, WA, Australia, (1-13). 2-5 February 2010.

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Author Pritchard, David
Title of paper War, democracy and culture in Classical Athens
Conference name ASCS 31 [2010]
Conference location Perth, WA, Australia
Conference dates 2-5 February 2010
Convener Australasian Society for Classical Studies
Proceedings title ASCS 31 [2010] Proceedings: Refereed Papers from the 31st Conference of the Australasian Society for Classical Studies
Place of Publication Perth, WA, Australia
Publisher The University of Western Australia
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
Editor Neil O'Sullivan
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Athens is famous for its highly developed democracy and its veritable cultural revolution. Not widely known is its military revolution. More than any other city Athens invented new forms of combat and was responsible for raising the scale of Greek warfare to a different order of magnitude. The contemporaneity of these revolutions raises the possibility that democracy was one of the major causes of Athenian military success. Ancient writers may have thought as much but the traditional assumptions of Ancient History and Political Science have meant that the impact of democracy on war has received almost no scholarly attention. This paper summarises the finding of an international consortium which has investigated this important problem from multiple perspectives and considers what insights we can learn from ancient Athens for contemporary foreign policy.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Presented during "Session 1: Greek Warfare" as "Two Sides of the Same Coin: Culture and War in Democratic Athens".

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry
 
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Created: Tue, 22 Mar 2011, 20:39:34 EST by Dr David Pritchard on behalf of School of Historical and Philosophical Inquiry