The effect of intensive recast treatments on the long-term development of less salient structures in Japanese as a foreign language

Iwashita, Noriko (2010) The effect of intensive recast treatments on the long-term development of less salient structures in Japanese as a foreign language. Nihongo Kyoiku, 146 18-33.

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Author Iwashita, Noriko
Title The effect of intensive recast treatments on the long-term development of less salient structures in Japanese as a foreign language
Journal name Nihongo Kyoiku
ISSN 0389-4037
Publication date 2010-08
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 146
Start page 18
End page 33
Total pages 16
Place of publication Tokyo, Japan
Publisher Nihongo Kyoiku Gakkai
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The paper reports on part of a longitudinal case study which investigated a role of conversation in the acquisition of Japanese. In particular, the study examined effects of intensive recast treatments on the development of two grammatical structures. A growing number of studies have shown how native speakers provide negative feedback in their conversation with learners, and their potential effect on second-language learning. Recasts, in particular, have drawn research attention because of their unique properties (i.e., immediacy, saliency and reformulation components). A number of studies have shown some benefits of recasts for L2 development, some studies have also shown that benefits of recasts for L2 development depend on learner proficiency (e.g., Amar & Spada, 2009; Mackey & Philp, 1998; Iwashita, 2006), types of linguistics targets (e.g., syntax, morphology, vocabulary) (e.g., Iwashita, 2003; Leeman, 2003; Long, Inagaki, & Ortega, 1998). Futher investigations, especially studying less transparent forms in different L2, and for learners of different proficiency levels will be worthwhile.

The current study builds on Mackey and Philp’s work to examine whether a series of intensive recast treatments would facilitate long-term development of less salient structures. The results support Mackey and Philp’s findings, that learner performance on the use of the target features improved as a result of the intensive recasts. While a temporary negative impact was observed on the structures that learners were able to use correctly prior to the treatment, their performance soon returned to the initial level. The positive effect of intensive recasts was supported by the fact that learners maintained the same level of performance six months after the treatment. The study has implications for teachers’ use of error-correction strategies.
Keyword Interaction
Recasts
Longitudinal study
Case study
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Languages and Cultures Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 22 Mar 2011, 14:42:43 EST by Meredith Downes on behalf of School of Languages and Cultures