Rock matrix surrounding subfossil lemur skull yields diverse collection of mammalian subfossils: Implications for reconstructing Madagascar's paleoenvironments

Samonds, Karen E., Parent, Sara N., Muldoon, Kathleen M., Crowley, Brooke E. and Godfrey, Laurie R. (2010) Rock matrix surrounding subfossil lemur skull yields diverse collection of mammalian subfossils: Implications for reconstructing Madagascar's paleoenvironments. Malagasy Nature, 4 1-16.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Samonds, Karen E.
Parent, Sara N.
Muldoon, Kathleen M.
Crowley, Brooke E.
Godfrey, Laurie R.
Title Rock matrix surrounding subfossil lemur skull yields diverse collection of mammalian subfossils: Implications for reconstructing Madagascar's paleoenvironments
Journal name Malagasy Nature
ISSN 1998-7919
Publication date 2010-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 4
Start page 1
End page 16
Total pages 16
Editor Raherilalao,
Place of publication Antananarivo, Madagascar
Publisher Association Vahatra
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Due to the near lack of a Cenozoic fossil record, little is known about the origin and evolution of Madagascar’sextant fauna. Madagascar’s subfossil record (Late Pleistocene and Holocene) has been important for filling in the most recent part of this informational gap, contributing details on diversity and distribution changes in the recent past, but most research has focused on larger animals. Less attention has been given to the subfossil record of small mammals, despite thefact that these groups represent a substantial portion of the extant mammalian diversity. To evaluate the potential presence of subfossil microfaunal remains in cave breccias (calcite sediment), we used acetic acid to dissolve the matrix surrounding a nearly complete skull and mandible of Archaeolemur sp. cf. A. edwardsi from Anjohibe Cave, northwestern Madagascar. The resulting residue included fossil remains of all five orders represented by Madagascar’s extant mammals (Afrosoricida, Carnivora, Chiroptera, Rodentia, andPrimates), and one order, Artiodactyla, currently extinct in Madagascar, except for introduced forms. Species identified include Microgale sp. (Afrosoricida: Tenrecidae), Eliurus myoxinus (Rodentia: Nesomyidae), Hipposideros sp. cf. H. besaoka and Triaenops sp. (Chiroptera: Hipposideridae), Galidiaelegans (Carnivora: Eupleridae), Cheirogaleusmedius and Microcebus murinus (Primates: Cheirogaleidae), and Hippopotamus lemerlei (Artiodactyla: Hippopotamidae). Radiocarbon dating shows that non-associated surface finds of small mammals tend to be younger than extinct larger mammals at Anjohibe, underscoring the importance of using other methods to establish temporal associations of small and large mammals. This research demonstrates the potential for recovering subfossils from matrix that are typically discarded during the preparation of larger fossils, and highlights the potentially significant loss of information if such sediments are ignored.
Keyword Small mammals
Paleontology
Acetic acid preparation
Subfossils
Madagascar
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 22 Mar 2011, 13:52:35 EST by Bacsweet Kaur on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences