Species shift and resistance: Challenges for Australian cotton systems

Werth, Jeff, Thornby, David, Walker, Steve, Charles, Graham and McDonald, Craig (2010). Species shift and resistance: Challenges for Australian cotton systems. In: S. M. Zydenbos, Proceedings of the Seventeenth Australasian Weed Conference (2010) - New Frontiers in New Zealand: Together we can beat the weeds. Seventeenth Australasian Weeds Conference (2010), Christchurch, New Zealand, (20-23). 26-30 September 2010.

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Author Werth, Jeff
Thornby, David
Walker, Steve
Charles, Graham
McDonald, Craig
Title of paper Species shift and resistance: Challenges for Australian cotton systems
Conference name Seventeenth Australasian Weeds Conference (2010)
Conference location Christchurch, New Zealand
Conference dates 26-30 September 2010
Proceedings title Proceedings of the Seventeenth Australasian Weed Conference (2010) - New Frontiers in New Zealand: Together we can beat the weeds
Place of Publication Christchurch, New Zealand
Publisher New Zealand Plant Protection Society
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
Editor S. M. Zydenbos
Start page 20
End page 23
Total pages 4
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Weed control practices in the Australian
cotton industry, both in crop and fallow, are now heavily
reliant on glyphosate. Even before the introduction
of glyphosate-tolerant varieties, glyphosate was
increasingly being used for pre-plant knockdowns,
and shielded sprays within the crop. To determine
any changes in species composition resulting from
this reliance on glyphosate, we re-surveyed 50 fields
previously surveyed in 2001. Results showed a species
shift, with flaxleaf fleabane and sowthistle now dominating
the flora in cotton systems. Other glyphosatetolerant
species, such as Australian bindweed, have
also increased in a number of fields. Bladder ketmia,
peachvine and awnless barnyard grass were also common
in the majority of fields. A further threat to the
industry was the identification of the first glyphosateresistant
weed in Australian cotton systems, awnless
barnyard grass. This paper outlines these challenges
for the industry, and explores a range of chemical
management options for these glyphosate-tolerant
and resistant weeds.
Keyword Glyphosate resistance
Species shift
Survey
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
 
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Created: Mon, 21 Mar 2011, 08:49:29 EST by Samantha Richards on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation