Survey of health and licensing policies for taxi drivers in Singapore, Hong Kong and Australia: a perspective from evidence on older drivers

Chan, M. L, Gustafsson, L. and Liddle, J. (2010) Survey of health and licensing policies for taxi drivers in Singapore, Hong Kong and Australia: a perspective from evidence on older drivers. Singapore Medical Journal, 51 12: 913-922.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Chan, M. L
Gustafsson, L.
Liddle, J.
Title Survey of health and licensing policies for taxi drivers in Singapore, Hong Kong and Australia: a perspective from evidence on older drivers
Journal name Singapore Medical Journal   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0037-5675
Publication date 2010-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 51
Issue 12
Start page 913
End page 922
Total pages 10
Place of publication Singapore, Singapore
Publisher Singapore Medical Association
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Introduction: With an ageing population, policy makers need to balance active ageing needs with older driver safety. In 2009, a survey of licensing policies for taxi drivers in Singapore, Hong Kong and Australia was undertaken for an evidencebased review of policies.

Methods: Licensing requirements collected using semi-structured questionnaires were compared descriptively and with evidence from licensing policies on older drivers.

Results: All the regions used medical certifications with vision screening. The frequency of medical certification varied according to the renewal cycle and age. Medical guidelines on fitness to drive were available in Australia and Singapore. Legislation for self-reporting of medical conditions by drivers existed in Australia and Hong Kong. Legislation for reporting at-risk drivers by doctors was limited to two Australian states. There were differences in the minimum age and driving experience criteria, the use of practical training, written and English tests, age- based screening, mandatory retirement age, refresher courses, off- and on-road tests.

Conclusion: Medical screening for at-risk drivers remains crucial. Age-based mandatory retirement policy at 73 years in Singapore is contrary to evidence-based practice. The lack of legislation for self-reporting of illness by drivers, the high minimum age criteria and therapy driving assessments for healthy taxi drivers are also unique to Singapore. There was stricter agebased relicensing from the age of 65 years in some Australian states and in Singapore. Continuing education for doctors, multi-tier screening for at-risk drivers and licensing policy changes are indicated.  © 2011 Singapore Medical Association.
Keyword Driver
Evidence
Health policy
Licensing
Medical guidelines
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Sun, 20 Mar 2011, 00:01:49 EST