Examining the impact of "visible differences" on multiple marginalization of Somali and Sudanese former refugees in Australia

Hebbani, Aparna and McNamara, Jayson (2010). Examining the impact of "visible differences" on multiple marginalization of Somali and Sudanese former refugees in Australia. In: Kerry McCallum, 2010 Conference of the Australia and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA 10), Canberra, Australia, (). 7-9 July 2010.

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Author Hebbani, Aparna
McNamara, Jayson
Title of paper Examining the impact of "visible differences" on multiple marginalization of Somali and Sudanese former refugees in Australia
Conference name 2010 Conference of the Australia and New Zealand Communication Association (ANZCA 10)
Conference location Canberra, Australia
Conference dates 7-9 July 2010
Place of Publication Canberra, Australia
Publisher ANZCA
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781740883191
Editor Kerry McCallum
Total pages 13
Language eng
Abstract/Summary From 1998 to 2008, a total of 3,543 Somali and 24,447 Sudanese settlers came to Australia, most of them under the refugee status. This intake is, to some extent, reflective of Australia’s most recent approach to humanitarian resettlement that has fostered a shift of policy priority, with approximately 70 per cent of all entrants since 2003 arriving from Africa. Hence, as a growing and visibly different minority group, many African arrivals have been a focal point in recent research about the impact of their racial visibility in discrimination. While subject to multiple forms of marginalisation as refugees and as Africans, many have also been stigmatised on religious grounds because of the 9/11 terrorist attacks and perhaps, more recently, due to some extremist activities in Australia. Therefore, this paper, which leans on the work done by Colic-Peisker and Tilbury (2007), examines the role of racial, religious, and tribal visibility and the resulting marginalisation on the Somali and Sudanese former refugee communities now settled in Australia. We first discuss issues of visible difference for Somali and Sudanese Australians followed by the impact of their particular visible markers on employment. The paper concludes with a dialogue of the multiple layers of marginalisation that Somali and Sudanese refugees face in an employment context due to visible difference, which may also help explain the discrimination in the labour market.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes Conference theme - Media, democracy and change

Document type: Conference Paper
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