A new ecohydraulic management paradigm for salt affected ecosystems and wetlands in low-gradient semi-arid environments

Callow, John Nikolaus, Coles, Neil and Hall, Tegan (2010). A new ecohydraulic management paradigm for salt affected ecosystems and wetlands in low-gradient semi-arid environments. In: Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Ecohydraulics. 8th International Symposium on Ecohydraulics (ISE 2010),, Seoul, South Korea, (1596-1603). 12-16 September 2010.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Callow, John Nikolaus
Coles, Neil
Hall, Tegan
Title of paper A new ecohydraulic management paradigm for salt affected ecosystems and wetlands in low-gradient semi-arid environments
Conference name 8th International Symposium on Ecohydraulics (ISE 2010),
Conference location Seoul, South Korea
Conference dates 12-16 September 2010
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 8th International Symposium on Ecohydraulics
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Fully published paper
Start page 1596
End page 1603
Total pages 8
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Abstract/Summary Land clearing for dryland agriculture has altered landscape water balance and is associated with severe valley-floor secondary dryland salinity within parts of Australia, South-East Asia, Africa, North and South America. The pervasive hydrologic process-response model is termed the “hillslope recharge-discharge model” (HRD Model), and attributes salinisation to increased hillslope recharge and rising groundwater tables resulting from reduced evapotranspiration potential following land clearing. New research suggests that internal redistribution of surface water from moderately-sloped hillslopes onto low-gradient broad valley floors, termed the “shedding-receiving model”, may be a significant additional salinisation mechanism and alternative management strategies may be required. A meso-scale surface water gauging network and four valley floor surface water-groundwater interaction sites were established in the Toolibin Lake catchment in southwestern Australia. Based on two years of data, we confirm that the shedding-receiving model holds in this landscape, operating in combination with the pervasive HRD model. There is significant rainfall runoff from moderately sloped uplands, onto low gradient valley floors and high transmission losses result from top-down preferential pathway recharge after the break of season. A new management paradigm was proposed to address the internal runoff redistribution and salt exfiltration mechanisms caused by the shedding receiving behaviour. A lowgradient, broad-based channel, approximately 25m wide, 0.4m deep and running at the valley floor gradient (~0.0003 – 0.0015) was designed to carry a 1:3yr flow. Insights gained from this study of the hydrodynamics suggests that this new approach offers significant opportunity to improve local and downstream resource condition.
Keyword Dryland salinity
Hillslope recharge discharge model
Dryland agriculture
Ecohydrology
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes SS7D-6 paper No. 421

 
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Created: Fri, 18 Mar 2011, 15:23:58 EST by Dr Nick Callow on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management