The Revised Transactional Model (RTM) of occupational stress and coping: An improved process approach

Goh, Yong Wah, Sawang, Sukanlaya and Oei, Tian P.S. (2010) The Revised Transactional Model (RTM) of occupational stress and coping: An improved process approach. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Organisational Psychology, 3 1: 13-20.

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Author Goh, Yong Wah
Sawang, Sukanlaya
Oei, Tian P.S.
Title The Revised Transactional Model (RTM) of occupational stress and coping: An improved process approach
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Organisational Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1835-7601
Publication date 2010
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 3
Issue 1
Start page 13
End page 20
Total pages 8
Editor Kathryn Von Treuer
Place of publication Bowen Hills, QLD, Australia
Publisher Australian Academic Press
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Despite more than three decades of research, there is a limited understanding of the transactional process of appraisal, stress and coping. This has led to calls for more focused research on the entire process that underlies these variables. To date, there remains a paucity of such research. The present study examined Lazarus and Folkman’s (1984) transactional model of stress and coping. One hundred and twenty nine Australian participants with full time employment (i.e., nurses and administration employees) were recruited. There were 49 male (age mean = 34, SD = 10.51) and 80 female (age mean = 36, SD = 10.31) participants. The analysis of three path models indicated that in addition to the original paths, which were found in Lazarus and Folkman’s transactional model (primary appraisal➔secondary appraisal➔stress➔coping), there were also direct links between primary appraisal and stress level time one and between stress level time one to stress level time two. This study has provided additional insights into the transactional process that will extend our understanding of how individuals appraise, cope and experience occupational stress.
Keyword Transactional model
Process
Stress
Coping
Appraisal
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 18 Mar 2011, 08:40:13 EST by Lucy O'Brien on behalf of School of Psychology