What facets of mindfulness contribute to psychological well-being and depressive, anxious, and stress-related symptomatology?

Cash, Morgan and Whittingham, Koa (2010) What facets of mindfulness contribute to psychological well-being and depressive, anxious, and stress-related symptomatology?. Mindfulness, 1 3: 177-182. doi:10.1007/s12671-010-0023-4

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Author Cash, Morgan
Whittingham, Koa
Title What facets of mindfulness contribute to psychological well-being and depressive, anxious, and stress-related symptomatology?
Journal name Mindfulness   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1868-8527
1868-8535
Publication date 2010-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12671-010-0023-4
Volume 1
Issue 3
Start page 177
End page 182
Total pages 6
Editor Nirbhay Singh
Place of publication New York, NY, U.S.A.
Publisher Springer New York
Collection year 2011
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Since the 1980s, mindfulness techniques have been increasingly utilized in clinical psychology, often as an adjunct to cognitive or behavioral interventions and with a growing evidence base. According to a five-facet operationalization, mindfulness is a capacity to (a) observe, (b) describe, and (c) act with awareness of present moment experience, with a (d) nonjudgmental and (e) nonreactive attitude. The aim of this study was to identify which of the five facets of mindfulness predicts psychological well-being and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress in a community sample comprising nonmeditators and experienced meditators. Participants were recruited from meditation organizations (Vipassana and Zen) as well as undergraduate psychology students (N = 106). Participants completed a Web-based questionnaire assessing mindfulness, psychological symptoms, and well-being. A higher degree of the nonjudgmental aspect of mindfulness was found to predict lower levels of depression, anxiety, and stress-related symptomatology. A higher degree of the act with awareness of present moment experience aspect of mindfulness was found to predict lower depressive symptomatology. Improved knowledge of the relationship between specific facets of mindfulness and specific psychological symptoms may improve intervention development and the clinical use of mindfulness.
© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010
Keyword Mindfulness
Meditation
Depression
Anxiety
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2011 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 18 Mar 2011, 01:09:15 EST by Dr Koa Whittingham on behalf of School of Psychology