Amplitude and duration of anticipatory postural adjustments are dependent on acceleration and remain unchanged in Parkinson’s Disease

Hall, L. M., Brauer, S.G. and Hodges, P.W. (2010). Amplitude and duration of anticipatory postural adjustments are dependent on acceleration and remain unchanged in Parkinson’s Disease. In: Abstracts of the 2nd World Parkinson Congress. 2nd World Parkinson Congress, Glasgow, Scotland, (S648-S648). 28 Septemebr-1 October 2010.

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Author Hall, L. M.
Brauer, S.G.
Hodges, P.W.
Title of paper Amplitude and duration of anticipatory postural adjustments are dependent on acceleration and remain unchanged in Parkinson’s Disease
Conference name 2nd World Parkinson Congress
Conference location Glasgow, Scotland
Conference dates 28 Septemebr-1 October 2010
Proceedings title Abstracts of the 2nd World Parkinson Congress   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name Movement Disorders   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Hoboken, NJ, U.S.A
Publisher Wiley & Sons
Publication Year 2010
Sub-type Published abstract
ISSN 0885-3185
1531-8257
Volume 25
Issue S3
Start page S648
End page S648
Total pages 1
Language eng
Subjects 1199 Other Medical and Health Sciences
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes WPC 2010 ABSTRACTS: P13.27

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 17 Mar 2011, 13:36:24 EST by Associate Professor Sandy Brauer on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences