Roles of cellulose and xyloglucan in determining the mechanical properties of primary plant cell walls

Whitney, Sarah E.C., Gothard, Michelle G.E., Mitchell, John T. and Gidley, Michael J. (1999) Roles of cellulose and xyloglucan in determining the mechanical properties of primary plant cell walls. Plant Physiology, 121 2: 657-663. doi:10.1104/pp.121.2.657


Author Whitney, Sarah E.C.
Gothard, Michelle G.E.
Mitchell, John T.
Gidley, Michael J.
Title Roles of cellulose and xyloglucan in determining the mechanical properties of primary plant cell walls
Journal name Plant Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0032-0889
1532-2548
Publication date 1999-10-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1104/pp.121.2.657
Volume 121
Issue 2
Start page 657
End page 663
Total pages 7
Place of publication Rockville, MD, United States
Publisher American Society of Plant Biologists
Language eng
Abstract The primary cell walls of growing and fleshy plant tissue mostly share a common set of molecular components, cellulose, xyloglucan (XyG), and pectin, that are required for both inherent strength and the ability to respond to cell expansion during growth. To probe molecular mechanisms underlying material properties, cell walls and analog composites from Acetobacter xylinus have been measured under small deformation and uniaxial extension conditions as a function of molecular composition. Small deformation oscillatory rheology shows a common frequency response for homogenized native cell walls, their sequential extraction residues, and bacterial cellulose alone. This behavior is characteristic of structuring via entanglement of cellulosic rods and is more important than cross-linking with XyG in determining shear moduli. Compared with cellulose alone, composites with XyG have lower stiffness and greater extensibility in uniaxial tension, despite being highly cross-linked at the molecular level. It is proposed that this is due to domains of cross-linked cellulose behaving as mechanical elements, whereas cellulose alone behaves as a mat of individual fibrils. The implication from this work is that XyG/cellulose networks provide a balance of extensibility and strength required by primary cell walls, which is not achievable with cellulose alone.
Keyword Polysaccharides
Features
Models
Growth
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 17 Mar 2011, 06:39:44 EST