Divalent cations influence colon cancer cell adhesion in a murine transplantable tumor model

van Zyp, Jochem van der Voort, Conway, William C., Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi, Polin, Lisa and Basson, Marc D. (2005). Divalent cations influence colon cancer cell adhesion in a murine transplantable tumor model. In: American Journal of Surgery. 29th Annual Surgical Symposium of the Association of VA Surgeons, Salt Lake City, UT, United States, (701-707). 11-13 March 2005. doi:10.1016/j.amjsurg.2005.07.006


Author van Zyp, Jochem van der Voort
Conway, William C.
Thamilselvan, Vijayalakshmi
Polin, Lisa
Basson, Marc D.
Title of paper Divalent cations influence colon cancer cell adhesion in a murine transplantable tumor model
Conference name 29th Annual Surgical Symposium of the Association of VA Surgeons
Conference location Salt Lake City, UT, United States
Conference dates 11-13 March 2005
Proceedings title American Journal of Surgery   Check publisher's open access policy
Journal name American Journal of Surgery   Check publisher's open access policy
Place of Publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Publication Year 2005
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.1016/j.amjsurg.2005.07.006
ISSN 0002-9610
1879-1883
Volume 190
Issue 5
Start page 701
End page 707
Total pages 7
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Background: Cancer cells adhere principally by integrins, matrix receptors that may be influenced by divalent cations. Surgical wound fluid is high in Mg2+ and low in Ca2+. We hypothesized that Mg+ and Mn2+ promote perioperative adhesion of shed cancer cells to surgical sites and that washing surgical wounds with Ca2+ inhibits implantation.
Methods: We tested our hypothesis in a murine colon 26 adenocarcinoma model. We added 10 mmol/L CaCl2, 0.25 mmol/L MgCl2, or 0.5 mmol/L MnCl2 to suspended murine colon 26 cancer cells and placed these suspensions into wounds in anesthetized mice. After 30 minutes, we washed away nonadherent cells. In some studies, we 51Cr-labeled the cells and assayed tumor adhesion by wound radioactivity. In parallel studies, we closed the wounds and observed the mice for 90 days.
Results: Mg2+ increased adhesion to 188% ± 15% of control (n = 10, P < .001) and Mn2+ to 130% ± 6% (n = 7, P < .001). However, Ca2+ inhibited adhesion to 61% ± 12% (n = 7, P = .006) of control. Seventy-two percent of survival controls developed tumors during follow-up. Mg2+ and Mn2+ stimulated tumor formation to 96% and 92%, respectively, but adding Ca2+ to the wounds reduced subsequent tumor formation to 56% without altering serum Ca2+. The survival curves each differed significantly by log-rank test (P < .01 each). All pair-wise multiple comparisons were significant (Holm-Sidak, P < .05 each).
Conclusion: Thus, the high Mg2+ in endogenous wound fluid may potentiate tumor cell adhesion. However, 10 μmol/L Ca2+ inhibits cancer cell adhesion to murine wounds and subsequent tumor development. Irrigating with dilute CaCl2 could decrease local tumor recurrence by inhibiting the adhesion of shed tumor cells.
Keyword Adhesion
Calcium
Cation
Cancer
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 14 Mar 2011, 18:53:03 EST